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2011 Buick Regal Spotted in Michigan During Photo Shoot

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A few days after General Motors officially announced that it is planning to sell the Opel Insignia as the Buick Regal in the States, and a sharp-eyed FaceBook user spotted the mid-size sedan in downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan as it was being photographed outside the Art Museum (or so the poster claims). The picture was then posted on Buick's official FaceBook page.

We can't be sure if this is the actual North American spec model that will go on sale within the next year or so, but we can say that it looks slightly different than the Chinese spec Buick Regal as this example is clearly based on the European Insignia featuring the same-shaped larger front grille and lower air inlets.

Although it is shares the same Epsilon 2 platform with the new 2010 Buick LaCrosse, the Regal is 7-inches shorter than the latter measuring 190-in. (4,830mm) in length meaning that when it goes on sale in the U.S. sometime towards the end of 2010 or early 2011, it will fit right under the LaCrosse in Buick's car range both size- and price-wise.

Source: Facebook , Via: Autoblog.com





23 Comments:

AutoTribute said... »October 16, 2009

Looking good. I would buy it over any Acura or Lexus based on looks alone. Buick's reliability is up there with Lexus', too.

car said... »October 16, 2009

German engineering for America and GM by Opel;))

ms said... »October 16, 2009

This is the european Opel Insignia, not the chinese version, and i am sure it will come from the Opel factory in Ruesselheim, Germany to the US.

Anonymous said... »October 16, 2009

"German engineering for America and GM by Opel;))"

Tell me how this differs from the Chinesse Buicks?

It doesn't.

This isn't anymore German engineering than it is American than it is Chinese. This is more like a colabrative global effort led by engineers all over the world to build a platform that was funded by a multi-national corporation so that the car can be sold in various places on earth wearing differing badges, rims, colours, trim, and chrome.

Opel, Buick, Chevy, Holden...They're all the same thing, just different badges and colours sold in different places. There is no German vs American vs Korean vs Chinese vs Austrailian mentality anymore.

Tony said... »October 16, 2009

That's possibly the Chinese market version, perhaps a facelift. It's got a Buick badge, but it has no side marker lamps (orange) which are US legal requirement, and the front license plate holder is still European. No point in bringing in an Opel with a Buick badge, if it's for evaluation an Opel Insignia will do. It's either an evaluation model brought in from China perhaps to see how the US model will or should look like, or a Chinese car in America only for pictorials for their local catalogues.

Anonymous said... »October 16, 2009

The wheels of the Regal in the picture are not available in China. I also think that it comes from Europe, and not a facelift of the Chinese market version.

Timo said... »October 16, 2009

"this example is clearly based on the European Insignia"

Duh... Did any one of you read the article?

Anonymous said... »October 16, 2009

What are you talking about? This car and it´s new platform (Epsilon II) were developed at Opel's International Technical Development Center (ITDC)in Ruesselsheim, so it is german engineered. A lot engineering work were done there, and not in Detroit or elsewhere. And the same applies to the new Delta platform.

Anonymous said... »October 17, 2009

This looks good! I am not a big fan of GM products but the way Buick designs are so sexy I believe that they will at least give the Lexus ES a run for their money.

Anonymous said... »October 17, 2009

What are you talking about? This car and it´s new platform (Epsilon II) were developed at Opel's International Technical Development Center (ITDC)in Ruesselsheim, so it is german engineered. A lot engineering work were done there, and not in Detroit or elsewhere. And the same applies to the new Delta platform.


There is no Opel in the same way there is no Chevrolet. They are just names and badges afixed to cars sold by an organization (GM) and that's all they ever will be. Calling them X-nation built car by what country a branch office or design studio is located in is archaic and meaningless especally when engineers all over the world have input to give in the design of the platform. Tying them down to X-nation is boarderline nationalistic and negligent of the work made by engineers from other nations.

EPII is just a steel unibody. Dress it up any way you want in any colour and with any trim and you can call it an Opel or a Buick or a Saab all you like. The fact is just a platform that was devoloped with input drawn from a global resource of engineers from GM design studios and then 'decorated' to suit a regional market and/or demographic.

If you're still thinking of each GM brand being totally independat like they were 50 to 60 years ago, you'd be right. Today, none of them can sustain themselves independantly. Besides, during Opel's sale, GM let it become known that Opel wasn't generating money for them for several years. If they were, Opel would be independant and would have funded the EPI and EPII platforms entirely in-house.

Guess what? They didn't...it was a colabrative effort as are nearly all GM platforms that can't be traced back to about the late 80's (W-bodies, Mk1 P-bodies, N-bodies, and V-bodies are about the last of that indepentant crap and they were crap).

Anonymous said... »October 17, 2009

for Anonymous #1

"German engineering for America and GM by Opel;))"

"Tell me how this differs from the Chinesse Buicks?"

Here is how. The German version, workers were likely paid a fair salary. The Chinese version, was likely built by those making a spoonful of food a day. And it's quite possibly, a global effort in the fact that the Chinese steal American automotive trade secrets, making it global technology. Maybe that's how its different?

Anonymous said... »October 17, 2009

As a Eurpoean INSIGNIA owner/driver (2.0 cdTi - 160 hp, after kit applicati,on giving 188 hp), I would strongly recommend all of you to have a test drive with any of the engine options (needless to say the SPORT version is imcredible).
You will be amazed when you feel the handling/curving, this car is genious...

Anonymous said... »October 17, 2009

"The German version, workers were likely paid a fair salary. The Chinese version, was likely built by those making a spoonful of food a day."

Only the socaily-conscious consumers will care about that fact. That still doesn't make an EPII more German-less Chinese or vice versa.


"And it's quite possibly, a global effort in the fact that the Chinese steal American automotive trade secrets, making it global technology."

Stealing Ford's technology, yeah...if their caught.

But if all the design studios share the same info, what benefit does staling the knowlage have when everyone knows what it is anyway?

Besides, the Chinese have trade rules for foreign automakers if they are to do business in China - mostly in teaming up domestic automakers. In GM's case, it's with Shanghai Automotive. If Shanghai valued it's position as a compeditor, GM's technology would stay between them and Shanghai.

Problem is that China is too big and too active a market to ignore. You set up shop in China with a domestic brand and have your technology stolen, or stay out of China and miss out on sales.

Anonymous said... »October 17, 2009

I remember than GM people came from Detroit to Ruesselsheim and said that they want all your developments, patents, all the Know-How right now. Most of our patents are at GM now and for each car we build we have to pay fees to them.
Should I mention that Opel has never seen a cent for it´s own patents? The same applies to the design drawings of our cars. Dimensions, tolerances, materials,... . This is more important than a patent, it is an major development effort. But GM does not care. With the construction plans of our Insignia GM is building a Buick, a Chevrolet and a Holden. Everything with our construction, all with our Know-How. How do you find it? Alone last year we have transferred to GM 650 million euros. For what? Only for fees of our own patents.

In 1992 GM started with the globalization. At some point, the Technical Development Center of Opel in Ruesselsheim became the International Technical Development Center (ITDC). Only the U.S., we make ourselves, "said GM. That has not worked. But we must say, from GM's point of view it was an excellent decision.

GM build factories in China and Korea, where they reproduce our cars or engines. But the hardest thing was : GM has decreed that the people of Daewoo are allowed to use our developments, that´s the reason why they can build great cars such as the new Chevy Cruze. You give them everything they want, "said GM. We were horrified. But with the plans alone you can´t just copy Know-How.

For years, GM managers forced us into a false model policy. But the worst thing were the quality problems of our cars. That was horrible. What we have been ashamed. Awful. One day, people came from GM and they told us what they understood of quality. Rusty beams in the Astra for example. "So what?", They said, "but the car moves." The German management clenched their fists in their pockets. Brand new Astra, with rust in the beams, because of a few cents cavity sealing! Complete madness.

GM don´t understand the European market. They will never get it. The laugh themselves to death , if they hearing that an Astra costs 25 000 euros. Qualitatively we have now got further than VW, but i am still impressed about their love for Details and engeneering.

Recent downsizing technology, lots of power, power, torque from just 1.4 liters of displacement. This dwarf can replace a six-cylinder engine. But where does it come from?
It comes from OPEL! GM use our technologies to save themselves on the American market!

It is these people who have plundered Opel. It is these people who have imposed us to their model policy.

Opel is an independent car maker, and not just a name on car!!!

sam said... »October 17, 2009

I like it

ma said... »October 17, 2009

great looking car

Anonymous said... »October 18, 2009

That is a awesome car...i'm talking about the Subaru Brat in the background,the P.O.S. Buick can go rot in the used car lots with all it's other Regal brothers and sisters...the ones that haven't already been scrapped and are used to contain soup of course

car said... »October 18, 2009

Opel employs 8,000 well-paid people at the Development Center in Ruesselsheim, and is not really dependent on communal projects with other GM brands. Opel has enough experience to develop global platforms. GM has recently announced that the next Delta platform will develop again in Germany.

BTW do you know a best selling global GM car that was not developed in Australia,Germany or Korea?

Anonymous said... »October 18, 2009

"BTW do you know a best selling global GM car that was not developed in Australia,Germany or Korea?"

J-body. You lose.

ms said... »October 18, 2009

I mean an actual car from GM, and not a platform
from the past!

Anonymous said... »October 18, 2009

What did I say before? There isn't any specfic 'car' anymore. Just platforms with different trims and colours.

But if you want another, fine then. The GMT900. It is global as it is sold in markets outside the US, and it was not developed entrely in Austrailia, Germany, or Korea.

But, then again, as I said before it doesn't matter what country it's from. They are all just platforms funded from a multi-national corporation dressed up for different regions.

Anonymous said... »October 18, 2009

Maby you have misunderstood me, but what I wanted to make clear is that the Insignia is a German car and it´s platform was developed in Germany, it should not mean that platforms from America, or China, or Korea,... are worse.

Anonymous said... »October 20, 2009

at the end of the day, most of GM's success cars weren't developed in America, or by Americans....and i'm talking about the more recent times specifically....but even the c4 zr1 had lotus engineering...

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