Japanese Automotive Steel Supplier Faked Strength Data On Some Parts

| |

Japanese steel manufacturer Kobe Steel Ltd. is in the midst of a scandal following revelations that its staff falsified data about the strength and durability of various aluminum and copper parts used in a variety of industries, including the automotive world and used by Toyota, Honda and Subaru.

Bloomberg reports that the three automakers are planning legal action against Kobe Steel with Toyota revealing that it used the company’s materials in its hoods, doors and peripheral areas.

Kobe Steel asserts that it delivered materials to over 200 companies and falsified strength details about the metals to make them appear as if they met the quality standards of clients. It has been determined that the fabrication of figures was systematic and occurred at all four of Kobe’s aluminum plants in Japan.

In a statement, Toyota spokesman Takashi Ogawa said the carmaker was working to determine affected vehicles.

“We are rapidly working to identify which vehicle models might be subject to this situation and what components were used. We recognize that this breach of compliance principles on the part of a supplier is a grave issue.”

Kobe Steel claims that the falsification of figures impacts products shipped from September 2016 to August 2017. Estimates say it could cost $133 million to replace the parts.

PHOTO GALLERY