Marchionne Confirms Ferrari Crossover “Will Probably Happen”

Remember all those times that successive heads of Ferrari have said they’d never do an SUV? Yeah, well they are. And it’s not just a rumor any more.

“It will probably happen but it will happen in Ferrari’s style,” CEO Sergio Marchionne told reporters on a financial-earnings conference call. “That space is too big and too inviting and we have a lot of our customers who will be more than willing to drive a Ferrari-branded vehicle that has that king of utilitarian objective.”

Despite earlier pronouncements, the near-confirmation comes as no great surprise given the swirling reports of late and Marchionne’s recent record of having lead both Alfa Romeo and Maserati to launch their first crossovers in the respective forms of the Stelvio and Levante. Other high-end European marques like Bentley and Jaguar have recently launched their first crossovers, with Lamborghini, Aston Martin, and Rolls-Royce soon to follow suit – all based on the success of the Porsche Cayenne.

Bloomberg reports that official confirmation for the Ferrari crossover will likely come at the beginning of next year when the automaker presents its five-year plan to take it through 2022. If approved, the vehicle would stand to double both the company’s production and its profits.

Reuters emphasized that, according to Marchionne, the planned crossover would steer clear of compromising the brand’s values and image. “Whatever it is, it will be of the same caliber as anything else we’ve done,” said the chief executive, embodying “Ferrari style” but not “being able to climb rocks.” Instead we’re coming to expect something more along the lines of the all-wheel-drive GTC4 Lusso, but jacked up with an extra set of rear doors disappearing into the bodywork.

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  • Auf Wiedersehen

    “that king of utilitarian objective”

    I think there are far more and will always be far more capable utility vehicles than Ferrari can engineer and produce. Many with FAR more years of experience with that kind of vehicle. Land Rover comes to mind as just one. Nah, this will be a Rodeo Drive/Dubai/Abu Dhabi pavement pounder that the uber wealthy MUST be seen in. This is the equivalent of Taco Bell making fried chicken.

    And even if they do make one, it will be, in Ferrari fashion, extremely expensive…and just like the Bentayga, they will never see anything more than a light dirt road.

  • Well, “utilitarian” to Ferrari means that you’ll be able to get in and out of the car without having back problems, for start. 🙂

    As for the mentioned SUV, why not (everybody else is doing, and if it becomes too crowded maybe the fad will go away), but I am not too happy about this:
    “extra set of rear doors disappearing into the bodywork”

    I would like to see a true 4-door sedan from Ferrari… Estoque was looking good and change to Urus was not something I enjoyed.

  • AnklaX

    Just don’t, Ferrari. DON’T

    • Six Thousand Times

      Sad but you have to sell what they’re buying.

  • DMJ

    My God, another scary Marchionne move…Ferrari was in a leading position to be the only carmaker to be 100% pure, without SUV’s and diesels, keeping their pristine pedigree. Luca di Montezemolo would never aprove this, I’m sure that he resigned due to this bloody idiot.

    • Six Thousand Times

      And you wouldn’t go where the market and the money is?

      • Vassilis

        When you don’t really need to, no you shouldn’t.

        • Six Thousand Times

          Really? The global sports car market is shrinking. The SUV market is booming. Ferrari should stay away from the boom and cut itself off from the development money it will need to keep alive? I hate luxury and sports SUVs, too but I live in the world of real business.

          • DMJ

            Is shrinking but not for them.

          • Vassilis

            Check this out: http://www.carscoops.com/2017/08/ferrari-revenue-soars-to-1-billion-as.html

            The global sports car market may be shrinking for cars like the GT86, the Miata etc but that doesn’t touch Porsche, Ferrari, McLaren etc. I understand your point but I genuinely believe Ferrari doesn’t need to do it. I don’t think its survival depends on it. I think it’s simply about making more money but at what cost? Porsche being a little more mainstream can afford to have such models. Ferrari can’t or at least shouldn’t.

          • Six Thousand Times

            Good point but Ferrari cannot count on money from the mothership, nor can it accurately predict the future. The thing is, all around the world , the super-wealthy are gagging for SUVs – good, bad, either way. So, why not bank a little money from rich guys who don’t know any better to build some of the really good spots or racing stuff? If you’ve ever seen some of the really tasteful (not) Ferrari apparel, you know they aren’t immune to turning a quick buck so why not turn a few million quick bucks? It hasn’t hurt anyone else.

          • Vassilis

            Because it’s not what the company stands for. It’s true the merchandising is a little ridiculous but you can easily look past it since it doesn’t affect the cars. Introducing a model so drastically different than usual has much more of an effect. Porsche made the Cayenne because they got to a point that the company really couldn’t survive. They had to make it. Ferrari doesn’t. If they ever got to the same point it’d be OK but they’re not there yet and it doesn’t look like they will any time soon.

          • Six Thousand Times

            I just think those lines have blurred too much not to do it. In a perfect world, there would be no Cayennes, X6s, or Bentaygas but the real world is where real business takes place.

      • DMJ

        No. because here we are talking about a myth that doens’t even has the capacity to produce enought supercars for the demand. So they have market and they have money. This is just greed, and Marchionne trying to save himself from his incompetence.

        • Six Thousand Times

          Business isn’t about being happy standing in place.

          • DMJ

            They are standing in place since the first day, more than 60 years ago. Creating the best sportscars and Formula 1 cars, with amazing finantial results. That’s why their soul should remain untouched.

          • Six Thousand Times

            Business isn’t about souls. And nobody else has seen any damage to their souls when they’ve rolled out a crossover. Ferrari hasn’t always been in the black but had usually been able to count on a strong FIAT to help out. The whole world has gone SUV crazy and Ferrari would be making a mistake not to make hay while the sun shines.

          • DMJ

            Time will tell.

  • Eduardo Palandi

    Marchionne once said a Ferrari SUV could only happen “over my dead body”. thus now I’m waiting for his harakiri (and a new FCA CEO aiming to save Lancia).

  • Bash

    And that might just be the last stupid decision he would make before leaving the company.
    But hey!!!!…. it will sell, it well sell so good.

    • Six Thousand Times

      Explain how it’s stupid to sell what the market wants – even if we don’t like it.

      • Bash

        What do you think!! No brainer will know that even that it will sell really good but that would be killing Ferrari’s soul!! Come on man

        • Six Thousand Times

          Like the Cayenne and Macan have killed Porsche’s soul? Or, do you mean like the Urus will kill Lamborghini ‘s? Come on, man! Again, I’m no fan of these things but you’re not building cars to sell only to yourself.

          • Bash

            I see your point, really, but hey, we are on the same page here, I’m too not a fan of these things..

  • Six Thousand Times

    Ferrari willing to accept free money. Saw this coming.

  • alecs

    Dirt money for dirty wheels!!!

  • ediotsavant

    In just five years Ferrari goes from sports car company to a cuv company. The only sports car company left could well be Lotus.

    • Six Thousand Times

      Lotus has an SUV in the planning stages. Not sure there’s ever going to be money to build it but one exists.