FCA Tweaks Chrysler 300, Dodge Charger And Jeep Cherokee Trims For 2018MY

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles will look to increase sales of the Chrysler 300, Dodge Charger and Jeep Cherokee by altering trim levels this fall.

According to ordering documents distributed to U.S. dealers and viewed by Automotive News, FCA will start by altering trims for the 2018 model year Chrysler 300.

Currently, the Chrysler 300 range starts with the Limited trim level, rises to the S and C and is topped by the C Platinum. For 2018, the entry-level variant will shift to the Touring trim and be followed by the Touring L, S, Limited and C.

For the 2018 Dodge Charger, the existing base SE will be ditched and consolidated with the current SXT. All-wheel drive Chargers will be sold under the GT AWD trim level.

Last, but not least, is the 2018 model year Jeep Cherokee. FCA will scrap the current entry-level Sport and replace it with the more luxurious Latitude grade, while a Latitude Plus will then be added to the family. Pricing for the Cherokee Latitude will also fall from the current $25,645 starting price, excluding delivery. to $24,395.

PHOTO GALLERY

  • Jay

    So the S models with sans chrome where the entry level 300’s i had no idea but I do find them more attractive. I also figured painting the plastic bits body color costed more than chroming them..

  • Craig

    The 300 is still one of the best looking cars made. I’m not a huge fan of ‘six window sedans’. And I don’t like so-called ‘4-door coupes’ either.

  • FUNNY, I’VE ALL BUT FORGOTTEN ABOUT THE 300.

  • carlbolt

    The 300 is a dinosaur. It uses a Mercedes E class platform at least three generation ago maybe four.

    • Craig

      That’s not true anymore. Not since the 2011 model. Not even the transmissions come from MB anymore.

      • Bob White

        False, they still use the aging MB platform which dates back to the late 90’s.

        The Grand Cherokee also uses a MB platform, but it’s more current.

        • Craig

          From Automotive News – June 24, 2011

          “With so much attention focused on Sergio Marchionne and Fiat, the story behind the 2011, second-generation Chrysler 300 and Dodge Charger sedans has been lost. Neither car is a warmed-over version of the previous-generation sedan, merely dressed up with new sheet metal and a spiffed-up interior. And the Daimler link? With one exception, it’s gone, and that remaining connection is on its way out, too. When the first-generation 300 appeared in 2004, and when the Charger followed, much was made of the fact that the sedans shared a range of Mercedes-Benz E- and C-class components. The steering column, front seat frames, five-speed automatic transmission, rear suspension architecture and more came from the Mercedes parts bin. The collaboration was done to improve the perception of the 300 and Charger and allow some of Chrysler’s lineup to bask in the glow of Mercedes’ engineering excellence. It also was a way to cut product development costs because the parts already were engineered. Some 300 and Charger owners laughed they were getting a bit of a Mercedes for a Chrysler price.

          That’s not the formula for the 2011 300 and Charger, says Tom McCarthy, the 300’s chief engineer. I spoke to McCarthy Thursday at a press event Chrysler held at its proving grounds in Chelsea, Mich. Chrysler staged the event to showcase the 2011 Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep and Ram lineup. It was an unusual step. Normally at this time of year an automaker would be taking the wraps off the 2012 lineup. But because of the late introduction of some of its 2011 models, and budget cuts that have downsized fleets for media, many journalists still have not driven Chrysler’s 16 new or revamped models. McCarthy said the 2011 300 and Charger have a new rear suspension, steering column, seat frames, wiring harnesses and switches. The list goes on. Even the chassis is new. “I think a lot of people just assumed it was a carryover chassis from the previous car,” he said. “It is not. It is all new.”

          While development of the second-generation 300 and Charger started under Daimler, the Mercedes connection is nearly gone — the lone exception is the five-speed automatic transmission. That comes from the German automaker. But that soon will be replaced with a ZF transmission, which Automotive News reported more than a year ago.”

          • Bob White

            Just because it’s written, doesn’t mean it’s true. If they had spent a billion $ to engineer a new platform, it wouldn’t be this size. The reality is that Mercedes stop supplying them with several components and they had to source them elsewhere with the majority now coming from China. There will be a new platform close to 2020 but for now this is the same old version. A close friend of mine is an engineer at the Brampton, Ontario plant. He should know.

          • Craig

            Go away!

          • Bob White

            Not a big fan of the truth are you? You must be a big fan of Trump with his lies and fairy tales.

            Put the old and new version of these cars on a lift and you’ll see it’s exactly the same platform with the same pick-up points. But in your mind, this not the version you want to hear? Beliefs and reality are not the same. Didn’t the preacher tell you that?

          • Six Thousand Times

            I wouldn’t count on Chrysler/Dodge surviving until 2020 for that new platform. They’re essentially running on fumes as it is.

    • Big Black Duck

      Dodge and Jeep seems to have found their niche…chrysler still has some soul searching to do.

    • TheBelltower

      It’s a dinosaur, but it’s a competitive one. Unlike the Crown Victoria or the outgoing Lexus LS, the 300 has been updated enough to still remain current.

  • psiqtas

    Rims shown on these 300 pictures are just gorgeous!

  • Six Thousand Times

    But nothing new.

  • nauticalone

    No updates for the Grand Cherokee? I like the Overland trim but wish it was available with body coloured mirrors and door handles rather than the chrome only.

  • Pooiu

    Man those cars look ancient.