Shell Partners With Leading Carmakers For Fast-Charging Network

Shell has reached an agreement with a host of industry-leading automakers to introduce ultra-fast charging stations along European highways.

The partnership involves Ionity, a joint venture recently established between BMW, Daimler, Ford, and Volkswagen, and will result in the rollout of high-powered charging outlets at 80 different highway sites across the continent in 2019, giving Shell a leg-up on many of its rivals.

In a statement, Shell claims that its fast chargers have a capacity of 350 kW and will be able to charge vehicles in as little as five to eight minutes, Reuters reports.

“Customers want to go on long journeys in their electric vehicles and feel confident that there are reliable, comfortable and convenient places to charge them quickly,” Shell’s head of retail Istvan Kapitany said.

The first 80 charging stations will be built in Belgium, Britain, France, the Netherlands, Hungary, Austria, Czechia, Slovakia, Poland, and Slovenia. When construction of these locations is finished, 20 additional stations will be built in Germany.


  • Michael_66589

    Shell is making tool to kill itself.

    • Six Thousand Times

      Not necessarily. If you’ve bought an electric car then you don’t need Shell but if Shell is in on the charging station they can still get some of your business. Maybe in that eight minutes it takes to recharge your batteries, you go inside for a sandwich and a bottle of water.

  • rover10

    Claims of five minutes are encouraging, but how far does that get you? I fear huge long lines of vehicles waiting to get a charging point at very busy periods. Such a prospect would most certainly lead to considerable enlargement of service stations, with a commensurate increase in service amenities to accommodate people who are sitting around, whilst their vehicles are charging. I would not be surprised if the average charge will be a minimum of ten -fifteen minutes, if that is the case, just how will that translate in haulage costs? Surely, hybrid is the best choice for haulage and business people with places to get to in fossil fuel times? At least the option of multi fuel vehicles enables less risky journey planning. One other major factor is the increase in vehicle pricing over fossil equivalents, if for example, an average electric haulage truck costs 50% more, that must lead to a significant price hike in the shops? You do have to wonder if there is a truly linked in thought process going on here, or just various fuel companies imagining their own solutions? The future is not necessarily bright!

    • MarketAndChurch

      If you can’t build out, than maybe they’ll build up. I’m reminded of those car vending machines in Japan, Dubai, Texas, etc. Elevators will your car for you to a floor where it’ll be parked and charged alongside maybe 10 others, while you hang out below and enjoy a beverage and ESPN sports center highlights in the lobby.

      I agree on your multi-fuel approach, that would be the dream.

    • People feared the same when gas stations started to appear. What is the difference? It’s never without a hiccup to introduce a new technology and built out its infrastructure. However in digital age we have a massive advantage: we can track and optimize the process. Tesla for example knows exactly which of their charging stations are getting filled up at what hours and they are able scale-up. So don’t worry, it will be solved.

      • rover10

        It will most certainly open up many opportunities for bright and imaginative ideas. Once autonomous vehicles are widespread, there may be technologies that would interface with ‘Charge Stations,’ so there would be fewer holdups or bottlenecks. This would possibly require some speed control from a central or regional traffic centre, but would help to improve traffic flow in general. Unfortunately, the days of being in total control of any journey short or long would be gone for good. I can see all long journeys having to be planned in advance on a first come first served basis. So, if you are planning a vacation of considerable distance, which would mean travelling through various regions, then advanced planning as if you were taking a plane or train would apply? In short, today’s motoring freedoms may quickly become a thing of the past? The future is not necessarily bright!

  • Shell we pretend our past didn’t exist?

  • pureworx

    it just looks like everyone is coming up with their own solution in the hopes of getting one up over their rivals.. without actually considering the long term goal or plan..

    any smart oil company would build solar arrays in the deserts near their oil fields and use the electric produced to generate hydrogen, ameding the oil infrastructure to handle hydrogen would be a lot easier and less costly than moving into the charging game.

    Electric powertrain will be the future, but not battery powered.. fuel cells would make more sense as they don’t lose capacity over time and the process of filling with hydrogen on a few mins and driving away is the same as what we today with gas/petrol/diesel.