Electric Vehicles Could Kill The Convenience Store

Electric vehicles promise to not only revolutionize various motoring industries but according to The Washington Post, could even hurt the beverage and convenience store industries.

Analysts from Morgan Stanley claim that as more electric vehicles hit the road, the number of motorists shopping at convenience stores after they’ve fuelled up could fall dramatically. This may also have a significant impact on beverage companies themselves.

Take Monster Beverages, for example. Roughly 63 per cent of its U.S. sales come from gas and convenience stores and its drinks are usually purchased impulsively at such stores. What’s more, Jeff Lenard from the National Association of Convenience Stores, asserts that roughly 60 per cent of all gas station profits are made from items sold inside, not the fuel itself.

“Beverages drive sales, and beverages drive profits at convenience stores, so any competition that could reduce those sales and those profits is a concern.

“However, I think that stores will do what they always do: They’ll find a better way to compete,” Lenard added.

These potentially disastrous effects are still some way off, however. ADD Systems industry expert Grant McAllister doesn’t think that electric vehicles will become common enough to have a lasting influence on the convenience store industry for at least another 20 years.

  • donald seymour

    It might kill the convenience store, but it won’t kill the corner store.

    But in all seriousness it won’t.

    • LeStori

      Thought the Supermarket had already destroyed the corner store. Where I live most supermarkets are open from 7am to 10 pm and some even longer. Bigger range, cheaper prices. the only ones that are surviving reasonably well are fast food outlets. the fat and the ugly waddle in and out…

      • donald seymour

        Naw, in the hood Black people go to the koner sto. And yes I said koner sto and no corner store.

  • Honda NSX-R

    Convenience stores can invest in charging stations, that way they can still get customers to purchase drinks and foods while their customers’ vehicles can get charged.

    • IFDU

      Also if anyone lives in or near the northeast, the convenient store WaWa already has Tesla charging station in their parking lots (some stores not all) so I don’t see how they can’t adapt. I only see the stores who don’t invest in them fall behind.

    • Bill Nguyen

      Seems they could make even more money, cuz you have to charge ev’s more than you have to fill up for gas in a normal car…

  • Nihar

    Lots of limited edition drinks, such as Mountain Dew flavors that you can’t find in regular grocery stores go to gas station convenience stores.

    • Status

      That is if you think a limited edition Mountain Dew flavour is even worth your time to hunt down.

      • Loquacious Borborygmus

        Haha!

  • Status

    Their entire business model, whether they sell gas or electricity, is largely dependent on selling food and trinkets. If you’re spending 5 minutes there to refuel or an hour to recharge, they’ll want to keep you there. Personally, I can’t stand being at a gas station for longer than 10 minutes, so I wouldn’t have any patience to charge an EV there for over an hour, much less buy crap they have in store.

    Home charging makes this entire matter a non-issue.

    • Six_Tymes

      Your point leads to what I have been saying for many years, that is, if they don’t get charging times DOWN to near or equivalent to that of gasoline cars, then Most convenience stores will go out of business. because, the only reason why people shop/stop in convenience stores in the first place is because its quick, like you said, “I can’t stand being at a gas station for longer than 10 minutes”. Most people, me included feel the same. So, the industry as a whole, better get their act in gear and solve the big issue, how to reduce charging times. Car manufactures already have the reference time, and that is whatever time it takes to fill an average sized car tank of gas. Come on car industry, GET ON WITH IT.

      • Status

        Nobody is doubting that EV charging times will need to shorten in the future. But the advantage that EV charging has over gas pump refueling, regardless of recharging speed, is that they can located near the home. Gas pumps will never have that level of penetration.

        Should car companies get their EV engineers to reduce charging times now for the sake of the convenience store industry 20 year from now? I’m not sure that would be in the automakers best interest.

        • Six_Tymes

          this was about convince stores, not auto makers interests. And my GET ON IT WITH IT was not directed at auto makers to hurry and save convince stores either. its not that difficult for you to figure out the intent.

      • MarketAndChurch

        I couldn’t agree more on the charging times. But I think we’re still mostly talking about a future that is more than 25 years away because in 10 to 20 years, we’ll all still be driving gasoline powered cars, even if those gasoline powered cars are hybrids. I plan to own the next car I purchase – which will be a hybrid just like my current one – for at least 15 years, and many people driving new cars today will still be driving those same cars 20 years from now, or somebody else in the used market will.

        • Six_Tymes

          You think so? I’m not so sure, I think in 20 years (using your estimate) it will be an EV majority by then.

          • MarketAndChurch

            It’s just that there are 250 million cars and trucks on American roads, and there’s about 15 to 20 million new cars and trucks sold every year in the US that gets added to that number. Even if EV’s made up the majority of all car sales in 20 years from now, it will still be in the minority of cars and trucks driven by Americans. You have to give a few decades more to allow for gasoline powered cars and trucks to be phased out before the majority of cars driven by the public will be EV’s. So that’s why I can’t see EV’s being the majority any time in the next 25 years. I think it’ll be a reality in the year 2060, or about 40 years from now. 3 decades of being the majority of cars sold will help make that a reality.

  • eb110americana

    This is pretty shortsighted. Filling up a car with gas takes maybe 3-5 minutes. Juicing up that vital 50% might be 20-30 minutes, so if anything, they have more incentive to have you come in and even sit down to eat. So the convenience store might evolve into more of a convenience store+fast food, but many truck stops are already like this. Yes, that means the infrastructure would have to change, but businesses will adapt–and in this case, the potential is to make more money, not less.

  • BlackPegasus

    Monster Beverages should leap ahead of the impending collapse of the convenience store by partnering with Tesla and other EV manufacturers to set up beverages machines at charging stations. When the EV revolution comes it will hit existing businesses and their outdated infrastructure like a dust storm. Just ask Blockbuster Video and Virgin Mega Music stores how past media revolutions impacted their business models. They sat on their collective azzes and allowed digital media full reign.

  • THERE’S NO EXPLANATION IN THE ARTICLE AS TO WHY. CHARGING UP STILL TAKES TIME, PEOPLE GET HUNGRY AND BUY AT CONVENIENCE STORES. NO DOUBT SERVICES CAN BE OFFERED AND BE A HUGE BOON TO BUSINESS. CHARGE YOUR CAR AND GET A MASSAGE OR MANICURE OR HAIR CUT OR A…

  • smartacus

    yes this is all assuming electric cars will actually exist.
    FYI there’s a trade-war brewing and most of those
    rare earth metals required for current batteries
    are controlled by Red China. NTM those new
    technologies are always a few years away.
    For the last 30 years; they’ve been
    Five Short Years Away

    • BlackPegasus

      I’m up voting this comment because of that fiyah ass font layout 👌🏽

      • smartacus

        thanks
        i dunno
        how it got
        to look like
        a Stair Step
        pattern like that.
        Guess it was just
        the choice of words.
        oops i think i did it again.

    • Six_Tymes

      All true and I agree. BUT, at one point in time a new technology will come along and change everything. I am not suggesting this is it, but it could be. https://www.engadget.com/2018/03/09/proton-battery-carbon-water-no-lithium/

      • smartacus

        if i did, it would certainly screw up Red China’s stranglehold on worldwide lithium.
        But then again; if it did have the potential of doing so, the J-stream media would
        be lambasting it with names like what they did with hydrogen “fool cell”

    • TheHake

      You’re not allowed to say Red China anymore… It’s not politically correct… 😀

  • dawyer

    Most Convenience place is your home. Autonomous car and other automated system(etc. merchandise, delivery) will changed “Do it yourself” concepts.
    Driving for fun and enjoyment of shopping will only was a luxurious recreation activities options for some people in willingness to pay.It’s possible that after many decades it will become a fact.

  • brn

    Yes, the same way pay-at-the-pump killed the convenience store.

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