Ford Taurus And C-Max Could Be On The Chopping Block

Just a few days after reports surfaced indicating that General Motors could slash its passenger car family, it appears that Ford is pondering similar measures.

As we recently learned, the new Ford Fiesta appears unlikely to arrive Stateside and sales of the outgoing model are likely to be stopped by the end of 2018 or 2019.

What’s more, production of the Taurus sedan for the U.S. market is reportedly on the chopping block for the end of next year and could be joined by the slow-selling C-Max, expected to be given the boot by early 2019.

In a brief statement, Ford said that it will detail its plans for the C-Max in a future announcement but didn’t specify when such an announcement will come, The Detroit News says.

Citing unnamed sources, Reuters indicated that six General Motors vehicles could be killed off after 2020, including the Cadillac CT6 and XTS. Cadillac boss Johan de Nysschen has since denied any plan to stop production of these two sedans.

We have reached out to Ford about this story and will provide an update when we hear back.

PHOTO GALLERY

  • I’mCallingYouOut

    Ford should take the Taurus name plate and create a sort of X6.

  • Rocket

    If Ford intended to keep the Taurus around, they would have given us the new model when it was launched in China. Ford still needs to consider the law enforcement and livery markets, so while the Taurus name might go away, I think Ford will maintain a large sedan in the lineup. I suppose it’s possible it could potentially be for commercial use only, however. Since law enforcement prefers RWD, an FR configuration built on the modular D6 seems like a good bet. Crown Vic Redux, anyone?

    • MarketAndChurch

      I think most government agencies, including law enforcement, would prefer the Explorer over a traditional car, and the Continental is priced low enough to appeal to enough buyers in the livery business. I think that’s going to be the strategy going forward, so I can’t imagine – from Ford’s view – an investment into a D6-based large sedan as being anything other than a waste of resources. Which is sad, as I’ve always wanted to see Ford bring out the 427 or interceptor concept.

      • Auf Wiedersehen

        My municipality ONLY has SUV police cruisers. Zero cars.

      • Rocket

        Maybe most do, but not all. Sedans are still very popular here in the Great Lakes, but most state agencies prefer the RWD Charger. If Ford is engineering a RWD Lincoln, as has been speculated, why not take advantage of the effort to go after Charger Pursuit sales?

    • Benjamin B.

      Law enforcement is happy with crossovers and SUVs. I see Ford Explorers and Chevrolet Tahoes everywhere now.

    • Benjamin B.

      I agree. I thought the Taurus was discontinued except for the SHO variant. I only saw the SHO at the last auto show I went to. I can’t believe they even had one. These are pretty cool cars btw. Should change the name because they are not anything like the old Taurus SHO. They compare more to the Audi A8 to be honest.

    • Zandit75

      Not being from the US, can I ask what is the “Livery” market?

      • Rocket

        It’s a for-hire vehicle such as a chauffered limousine or taxicab. The Lincoln Town Car and Ford Crown Victoria were the dominant players in those markets for many years.

        • Zandit75

          Cool, thanks for that!

    • Navy P. Morroccan ✓ᵛᵉʳᶦᶠᶦᵉᵈ

      Ford interceptor could be the Ford Explorer, and the liver market could become the Continental after the Lincoln MKT-Town Car gets the boot. In the mean time, Ford is offering many police departments the Ford Fusion interceptors, as well as Ford Explorers to make up the discrepancy with the outgoing Taurus.

    • Carlo

      I would love to see a aluminum RWD/AWD Modern Crown Victoria/Lincoln Town Car with ecoboost and 5.0 power! Everyone makes suv’s everyone makes crossovers why can’t someone just make an honest-to-God traditional big long American Sedan, modern technology can bring great gas mileage. These cars are icons.

  • Donald Ducko

    And cops will use??? What I don’t understand is if Americans can’t afford healthcare, 234 million get some kind of gov benefit, millions on food stamps, 94 million don’t work, millions still living with their parents, 70% don’t have $500 saved, 50% of Americans don’t earn more than $30k, etc HOW ARE THEY BUYING EXPENSIVE CARS??? You’d think given those stats the only thing people would be buying were fiestas.

    And enough with the SUVs and crossovers. They suck and offer nothing. Act like a grownup and get a sedan.

    • Obsequious Lickspittle

      We’ll all be sorry when all we can “drive” is an autonomous egg.

    • Kash

      Most cops use Explorers, Durangos, Tahoes, Expeditions, Super Duty’s, F150s, and Silverados, especially here in Vegas where they may need to go off road and we have a ton of open desert area.

      I had to laugh at a couple of your comments though: “They suck and offer nothing. Act like a grownup and get a sedan.”

      I guess a 3rd row, seating for 8 people, ability to wade through several feet of water in a flash flood, more interior and storage space as well as being more likely to be offered with AWD/4WD is nothing now.

  • rover10

    C-Max might be replaced by an ‘Active’ version of the Focus, when launch next year. Fiesta has an Active variant but not FWD. The Focus Active could however, be offer it as an option? The raised ride height would go some way to addressing the loss of C-Max? To truly replace C-Max, an Active estate version of Focus would be a likely strategy.

  • Grumpy

    Large sedans are dying.. and it’s ok. I prefer a CUV/SUV as a family hauler anyway.
    No need for a CMax. It doesn’t offer anything particularly unique.

    • Kash

      surprisingly it’s only the cheaper large sedans that are dying, at least from what I’m seeing. Things like the S-class seem to doing fairly well, but I don’t feel that’s 100% though. Things like the Impala are doing pretty decent (probably because of livery/rental business but still) while things like the Taurus are on a steady decline, then things like the LaCrosse are selling more in a single month than things like the RLX are selling in an entire year.

      So I don’t think “big sedans” as a whole are dying, just certain specific models are dying.

      • nellydesign

        Not really. The biggest sedans from the big three Germans sell under 1000 a month. The A8? Under 300 a month. The big American luxury cars sell marginally better, but then again they don’t really sell a direct competitor (maybe the CT6) and their profit margins are much smaller.

        • Kash

          but look at their yearly numbers. the S is up and down, same with the A8 and all others. they go up and down with updates and redesigns and then their sales slowly dwindle as they get ready for an update/redesign and then with the update their sales spring back up. The A8 went from 1,500 units in 2010 to 5,700 in 2011 in the US alone. So yeah their monthly numbers are low but their price is fairly high and if you look beyond 12 months their numbers follow a very common trend.

      • Grumpy

        I’v always considered the S an executive/limo car and not a family car.

        How much market share does Buick and Acura even have to stay relevant in a comparison? To understand the general direction, look at the big brands. The entire mid size segment has been taking a hit for the past few years, and it’s no difference one size up. The demand of large non luxury sedans is being traded for larger crossovers.

        • Kash

          The S-class is an odd duck, with the intro of the Maybach trim the regular S has shifted away from trying to be a limo and instead has become more driver oriented. I firmly believe the updated S63 will become quite the sports sedan once the reviews come out, and the next gen will become even sportier.

          I agree with you on the market shift from large sedans to mid-large crossovers for family cars, they just make more sense with the 3rd row.

          however, if we look at the current average customer for the likes of the LaCrosse and other large sedans, I don’t think they’ve lost the portion of the demographics they held before, rather the size of the demographic has shrunk all together, i.e. from death and people choosing not to drive after a certain age, etc. Does that make sense?

          edit: Even then, i still think it’s a case by case basis really. The RLX is dying while the XTS and LaCrosse are doing great in comparison and if you factor in their price and demographic then it makes their “low” numbers more reasonable.

    • Navy P. Morroccan ✓ᵛᵉʳᶦᶠᶦᵉᵈ

      Large sedans will come back sooner than you’d expect.

      • Status

        How will large, less roomy (relative to large CUV’s that share platforms), and less practical sedans come back? History doesn’t move in cycles, and the 1960’s attitudes to large car are dead and gone.

        • Navy P. Morroccan ✓ᵛᵉʳᶦᶠᶦᵉᵈ

          Look at the Lincoln Continental – an iconic car that has been to hell and back – has been revitalized and renewed to become luxurious as ever.

  • nellydesign

    Well, as far as Cadillac is concerned, it’s slowest selling sedan is actually the CTS. All their sedans are under 1500 a month in the US, with the CTS under 1000. Lincoln, by way of comparison has the similarly slow selling Continental, but the MKZ is almost double the sales of anything from Cadillac.

  • dumblikeyou2

    Wait, does this car have nine fucking lives? It’s still available since its homely roots as the Five Hundred by way of Volvo S80 circa 1998?

    • FoxJ30

      S80, 500, Montego, nuTaurus (gen1), nuSable, Freestyle, Flex, MKT, MKS, nuTaurus (current).

      So by my count, in different variations… 10 lives. So far.

  • Craig

    I don’t want a world full of nothing but CR-V’s and Tahoe’s . SAVE THE CAR!!

    • Status

      All caps will do nothing to change the shrinking public demand for sedans.

  • john1168

    Ford has never been serious about designing and building a nice large car. It looked hideous when it was the 500. “Year of the car” my @$$! Anyone remember that marketing horse $h!t when the 500 came out? The refresh/redesign helped the appearance but did little for the cars major short comings. I never understood how such a big car could have so little interior space. And now the Taurus has been neglected for the past few years. I’m really not surprised it’s on the chopping block. I was hoping for an all new one but I realized after the Chinese version came out that the US wasn’t getting a new one. Too bad really. When you’ve spent years building products nobody really wants, eventually people are going to buy something else that they find desirable.

  • Randy Terpstra

    Not a huge surprise. They’re already building an updated version of the Taurus in China, while not bothering here. And with the
    next generation Focus no longer to be built in North America (but imported from China), the related C-Max Energi (the only version we get) would also no longer be built here.

  • Silent Majority

    My 2016 Ruby Red Taurus SHO is a sweet and safe ride and if the Taurus is discontinued it will be because the market seeks more overall utility than driving pleasure. My Ford Flex provides the latter, but it’s not “fun” to drive. When the twin turbos and AWD kick in an propel my SHO down a straight stretch of highway or around some twisty turns, I just smile and forget that it’s two tons of steel providing me that smooth, safe ride. My Flex? Yeah, it gets me and a lot of stuff there, but not a lot of smiles.