Comparison Chart Shows How Far The Nissan Leaf Has Come

While the all-new 2018 Nissan Leaf hasn’t entered the U.S. market yet, future buyers can look forward to purchasing a car that’s significantly improved compared to its predecessor.

Even though it featured a familiar 5-door hatchback appearance, the design was of the fist-generation Leaf was quirky, to say the least – but that was probably intentional on Nissan’s part in order to emphasize that this wasn’t a conventional hatch but an all-electric model.

For the most part, the 2018 model managed to avoid looking “too different,” and is now scheduled to go on sale nationwide in January, priced from $29,990.

It also happens to be superior to the first-generation in multiple categories, as shown in this comparison chart put together by NissanPartsPlus.

“The Nissan Leaf is one of the most underrated and underappreciated cars on the road,” says Steve Ferreira, director of “Nissan has been building and selling reliable, affordable EVs with great range and performance for years. The 2018 Nissan Leaf is the next generation of a successful, practical vehicle. It should be getting a lot more attention than a car that still isn’t available from a company that’s hand-building EVs in a so-called ‘dreadnought’ factory.”

Since the 2018 Leaf is heavier, Nissan gave it a more powerful 110 kW (147 HP) engine, helping it get from 0 to 60 mph (96 km/h) in 8.8 seconds, compared to its predecessor’s 10 seconds. The newer model is also more aerodynamic, has a larger battery, twice the driving range, and more cargo room.

The icing on the cake is that, if you adjust for inflation, you’ll see that it’s also cheaper to purchase. Well done, Nissan.

  • brn

    Still fugly.

    • Marty

      But now it’s fugly in a “contemporary japanese car” way, instead of a “strange electric car” way. Which is a huge improvement. 🙂

  • Auto

    Dear Nissan,
    The reason why Tesla is succeeding is because they create hype. Name your car something cool, give it a lot of technological gimmicks (gullwing doors), and create a lot of commotion. People don’t care about quality, with Tesla they are buying an image. They want people to think they are doing things differently.

    • Nordschleife

      Model S and model 3 and X is not cool. What they all spell together is subjective but as standalone models their names suck.

    • EyalN

      $150000 cars are much cooler than $30000 cars. Musk knows how to create a hype, Carlos Ghosn knows how to make money. i don’t like the design of both companies

    • RobSez

      People think they want image until they get it. The Leaf is affordable for most, low maintenance, cheap to operate, safe and reliable. Teslas are the most expensive & costly to maintain 100% electric vehicles. When was the last time you heard about a Leaf fire? Don’t get me wrong, I’d be driving a Tesla Model X if I could afford one. But in the meantime my Leaf is quite practical and makes me happy while driving it.

    • Marty

      Tesla is “succeeding” because they create good looking and usable electric cars. Which is, quite unsurprisingly, something that people are prepared to pay for.

      But for some reason other car makers have stubbornly refused to produce good looking electric or hybrid cars, so Tesla had an open goal.

      This is now changing, and Tesla are unlikely to survive.

  • BlackPegasus

    The Nissan Leaf is quietly doing it right. Inexpensive, reliable and low costs per ownership.

    – I’m ashamed to say I’d still prefer a Model S though because of style 😉

    • brn

      $37K is inexpensive?

      Nissan is reliable? 😉

      I agree that we need an affordable EV. Unfortunately, we’re not there yet.

      • Hello Moto ✓ᵛᵉʳᶦᶠᶦᵉᵈ

        Around my area, used Nissan Leafs with around 33,000 miles on the odometer sell for $11,000 USD. Even at rock bottom prices, nobody is buying them here. Teslas on the other hand…..can be seen parked on every corner.

  • Tumbi Mtika

    The Nissan Leaf: The Android phone of electric cars.

  • Scotty Rides

    why does the illustration/chart show an icon of a gas engine?

    • Status

      Because, graphically, the average driver knows of that symbol to represent the engine when they see it lit on the dashboard. It’s a skeuomorph in almost the same way a save icon in software applications takes the shape of a 3.5″ diskette, even though the 3.5″ diskette is functionally obsolete.

  • krusshall

    I like the disclaimer “created for entertainment purposes only”!