Porsche Mission E To Offer Three Power Options: 402HP, 536HP And A Range-Topping 670HP

More information has surfaced on Porsche’s highly anticipated all-electric Mission E as the Germans gave early access to one particular member of the press.

Georg Kacher from Automobile magazine became the fourth person in the world to drive the white Mission E prototype and learned along the way some juicy details on the first electric Porsche.

The Porsche Mission E will be smaller than the Panamera, but the company aims to offer the same amount of room in the cabin with a car from the class above; using an electric powertrain frees up a lot of space but Porsche goes even further, creating a recess in the floorpan where the rear passengers’ legs go that splits the battery tray.

“The production version is in essence a C-segment sedan with an almost D-size interior,” said project leader Stefan Weckbach. “Visually, the car combines 911 overtones with fresh proportions and very good space utilization even though the Mission E is notably more compact than the Panamera.”

The other goal with the Mission E is to feel like a proper Porsche down the road; the company is hard at work in making the electric four-door model a true performance car, giving it a sharp steering and lots of grip but they also work on making the batteries and motors resistant to heat. Using a complex cooling circuit is their way of ensuring that performance will be constant and repeatable, unlike other electric models currently on the market.

Porsche is considering to offer the Mission E in three different power versions: an entry-level 402hp (300kW), a mid-range 536hp (400kW) and a range-topping 670hp (500kW) model, with all of them being all-wheel drive. Porsche might even add a cheaper rear-drive version later on.

The front electric motor produces 215hp and 221lb-ft of torque constantly, offering up to 325lb-ft for brief sessions of wide-open throttle. As for the rear electric motor, there will be two different versions of it: the base one with 322hp and 251lb-ft of torque and the performance one with 429hp and 406lb-ft of torque. A two-speed transmission is being developed to offer full-throttle upshifts, as well as an electronically controlled rear differential.

0-60mph is expected to be in the mid-3 second range while top speed will be limited to 155mph. Porsche targets a real-world driving range of 300 miles but most importantly, it wants the Mission E to recharge its battery to at least 80 percent capacity in 20 minutes or less. In order to do so, the battery cells will be able to charge with either a 800-volt capacity or a 400-volt capacity.

Pricing for the Porsche Mission E will be set between the Cayenne and the Panamera, meaning around the $75,000 to $80,000 mark, positioning it directly against the Tesla Model S when it finally arrives in the market in 2019.

PHOTO GALLERY

  • Mission E has been touted as key to Porsche future and I can’t wait if they manage to get Porsche dynamics into electric cars. Also I hope they do something about the design.

    • Bo Hanan

      How will this and the Panamera (Hybrid and all) live on the same sales floor together?

      • Panamera would be the luxury offering from Porsche while Mission E would be more towards the sporty oriented saloon. But again hybrid and electric cars usually had different buyer, so I don’t think they will clash.

      • Kash

        This is for people who want the full EV experience, Panamera is for those with range anxiety or people who drive too much for electric charging times, or people who want a wagon, etc. The Panamera is a stepping stone for customer to the Mission E basically.

        • Mark S

          The article states that the Mission E will be positioned between the Cayenne and Panamera and that the Mission E is considerably more compact than the Panamera. This is the Pajun.

          • Kash

            The Mission E is between the Cayenne and Panamera in PRICING, not market positioning. And Porsche also said the Mission E will be the size of a C-segment sedan on the outside while the interior will be on par with D-segment sedans in size.

          • Mark S

            Very Good Kash, so you know that a big part of Market Positioning is in fact Price and Packaging and that the ME is being positioned against the Model S, the Panamera is not a stepping stone to a ME. People who say already have a Panamera or Cheyenne and a 911 might consider a Mission E as a curiosity or green trophy car. Most mission E customers will not be first time or only one Porsche buyers that is unless they are former Tesla employees.

          • Kash

            It’s not about the model but the technology when I said the Panamera Hybrid is a stepping stone to the Mission E. Which is what the original comment was about, the question was “How will the Panamera Hybrid and Mission E exist in the same showroom?”

          • Mark S

            Easy, different missions.

    • Alter Ego

      Panamera hybrid did it and with sales so good it staggered Porsche themselves. They have serious incentive to make this thing the best electric car so far.

      • Totally agree, the Panamera Hybrid proved to be a success and beside they had a bigger stake since I’m sure the one that pushes Model E is the VAG board.

    • alexxx

      Already looking better then Panamera and how can you doubt Porsche dynamics?!

      • The design is not yet final, and Panamera Sport Turismo proved that Panamera design can be improved.

        And regarding dynamics, I never said I doubted it. I merely hoping if Porsche can get their electric car better dynamics than its rival. Beside they don’t always succeed, the new 718 proved to be disappointment in terms of dynamics.

  • PhilMcGraw

    While I personally think that this Mission E may be successful for Porsche and could be a real competitor to the Model S, I do also believe that there will be two areas Porsche needs to tackle if they want to succeed in competing against the Model S:

    1. 0-60 time if it is truly in the mid 3 second range, I think you will find Tesla enthusiasts and backers tout that the Model S is faster.
    2. If the Mission E does not come with some kind of technology package that offers things like autonomous driving then you will find those same people saying “Yeah but my car can drive itself”.

    Again, I am NOT saying those are my opinions (because 0-60 time is just one aspect of a car and I care more about how it drives, and I actually like driving a car instead of it driving me), but I am instead putting forth what I think will be the major dissenting opinions and comments you will find when it does release.

    • LWOAP

      Yeah, true, but they probably wasn’t going to consider buying a Mission E to begin with. Tesla fans are very loyal to the brand and probably wouldn’t get anything else even if there were dozens of alternatives.

    • nastinupe

      I don’t think that the 0 – 60 times will be an issue. It’s an electric so the performance will be there. Also, Porsche is part of the VW umbrella. They will definitely offer some autonomous driving options as well. Especially since Audi has been hard at work in this department.

      This car looks good, like really good. Even with all of the camouflage. Too bad it looks like it has next to no trunk space. If it has a decent frunk then that will make up for it.

      • Tumbi Mtika

        A car has NO RIGHT to look this good in camouflage!

    • Matt

      This is not necessary car to tackle Tesla Model S. Only when it comes 0-60 I agree.
      This is going to be a car that will corner so good, that it would be too scary to drive on the limit off the track. This is a Jetta exterior size car with the center of gravity basically on the ground and porsche’s know-how in the chassis, suspension, breaks, stearing (Company that made 911, 918, 911 GT2, GT3, you name it.) By no means this is a Tesla competitor, it is a compleatly different product – precision tool vs. muslecar 😉

      • Tumbi Mtika

        “precision tool vs. muslecar”

        No one could have put this into better words.

    • Those two would look good on paper but I personally don’t care about 0-60 and Autonomous driving. So far I see that a lot of Tesla fans aren’t exactly enthusiast but they see Tesla as a lifestyle. Much like an iPhone and Porsche brand itself has attraction that Tesla can’t match. In conclusion I don’t think they should focus on those two silly stuff since both buyers has different profile.

    • S3XY

      I personally hate Tesla’s that “drive themselves”. Never want a car to drive me!

  • Carmelo Van Cabboi

    The exhaust pipes in the rear are for?

    • LWOAP

      Those aren’t exhaust pipes. I do hope Porsche doesn’t include them in the final product.

      • Carmelo Van Cabboi

        I hope too because they have no sense!

        • DR.FUNK

          Battery cooling?

          • Oliver Moore

            Like the Koenigsegg Regera.

        • Astonman

          It’s to throw people off the trail. Part of the disguise.

    • OdysseyTag

      Was thinking the same thing.

  • LWOAP

    Really looking forward to it now. Personally, I don’t care for any autonomous technology and I really don’t see Tesla fans cross shopping a Model S with the Mission E. I have a feeling they’ll stick with Tesla regardless. Although, to be fair, I’ve been hanging around S3XY too much. lol

    • Tumbi Mtika

      I know right?

  • SteersUright

    If every a car will dethrone Tesla its this. Vastly better looking, likely far better made given Porsche’s decades of experience, and likely far better to drive (again given Porsche’s lockdown on enthusiast cars). I want to see Tesla succeed as well, but these spy shots must have them crapping their pants at least a little.

    • Bo Hanan

      As long as Porsche doesn’t get greedy you’re right. Current Tesla owners will see the new Mission-E as a “move up” from their Model-S.

      • Kash

        even with a much higher price than their competitors, most Porsche owners are okay with paying the extra because they feel like they’re getting their money’s worth in quality, performance, and dealership experience. You don’t really hear people saying “you can get X instead of the Porsche for less money and have more fun in it/better quality/etc.” for these reasons.

    • Matt

      Much better interior fit & finish /luxurious materials as well.

  • Ray Filetti

    Is anyone out there really “highly anticipating” an electric Porsche Model X Leaf? All electric cars are the same.

    • Alter Ego

      Um.. yes people are and no they’re not… at all… Fit EV =/= Mission E

      • Ray Filetti

        Hi Alter. Can you tell me what is to be anticipated? IT will have one or two electric motors, and lots of batteries. IT doesn’t look good. Yes, it may have lots of storage space. The only difference between all electric motors is their power output. Otherwise, they all make about the same whining noise, and their power/torque characteristics are about identical (max torque at 0 rpm). For me, engines and gearboxes provide almost all the character difference between “normal/regular/old tech” cars. I do need to be educated, so please help.

        • BobV12

          You need to get your ass in an electric Tesla/mission E and get it kicked with G’s to understand acceleration is the new noise. And that we have been developping the wrong techno for a century, for nothing.

          • Ray Filetti

            Yeah thanks for that. Isn’t that just a function of the size of the electric motor? I am into circuit racing, not drag racing, so I am not that fussed by a quarter mile time below 10 seconds. Anyway, put your foot down, and you will be getting towed home. Haven’t you seen the videos where the Teslas thrash the Lambo to the quarter mile, and the then the Lambo reels the Tesla in and passes it because they don’t have much of a top speed? So pick the parameter you want. I am asking about what makes an electric car, or a Porsche Mission, so interesting? To me, electric motors are all much the same, so what’s left? Looks? OK, if that’s all you want. Storage space? Handling? No thanks due to the weight of the batteries (even if they are low to the ground). So what makes on electric car so much different – in personality – to another? Thinking about, I did drive a Mitsubishi iMiev once, and I complained that it was a OHS hazard.

          • BobV12

            We need EVs to cut emissions (greenhouse+particles). Major benefit : instant torque. Major downside *for now* : the heavy battery. The top speed problem of a Tesla is a choice, I’d say. You can have electric engines running 10.000 rpm quite easily, and match you “power plan” : torque and speed for all your needs (highway, track day, hauling). An electric engine is simple : ONE moving part ! The maintenance of an EV is incredibly easy, or fast if you think track oriented.

          • Ray Filetti

            Bob. Thanks again. I agree with almost everything you say – without gears, you can’t have both fast acceleration and high top speed, and not having gears is meant to be a feature – except I would still like to discover how an electric car – any electric car – has a personality? (At least as varied as petrol cars)

          • BobV12

            The personality is a very good question indeed. I’d say it is composed by all the variables needed to engineer a car, and with a thermal car you have a LOT of variables. Like, a shitton. Think about every measurement needed to manufacture engine parts for example. Every one of them will affect the perf, may it be good or bad. With an EV, you are left with far less variables, especially on the engine. Overall the personality will boil down to the choices made on other aspects that may have been underlooked on ICE performance cars : interior quality, chassis tuning, grip, comfort… IMO we are living a revolution in the automotive world, similar to what happened to horses when ICE were developped.

          • Ray Filetti

            Bob. Thanks. I am a Porsche 944 owner. The engine and gearbox is such a pleasure to use. The steering (hydraulic) and handling is incredible. If I am to move with the times, I think I will have to accept that most electric cars will not provide the enjoyment of so many dynamic characteristics. The Mission will have sharp enough steering, similar to current Porsches, but not like my 944. It will corner at high G’s, if only because its tyres will be much bigger. It will ride extremely well, probably as good as my 944. And it will go fast, much more than my 944. But if I were to own a Mission and a 944, I think I would be taking out the 944 out to have fun – changing gears up and down, enjoying the engine note as its being revved out, heel and toeing down through the gears.

          • BobV12

            As some like to ride horses even if cars exist 😉 wish you the best and i hope you and i will drive a mission E one day !

        • Alter Ego

          There’s plenty of character to be found in the way the car drives even if it is electric. And the average buyer is more impressed by features, 0-60 times and comfort than what enthusiasts would call character. And even for the enthusiast if any automaker can make an electric car handle like a dream on track it’s Porsche. That’s why many people are excited (it really is obvious if you look outside the realm of petrolheads) about this car. I recommend looking past your own personal preferences.

  • Androuffle

    Wait, Tesla Model S is a full-size sedan means E-segment. The future Mission-E is a C-Dish sedan.

    Would it not be more appropriate to compare the Mission E with the Tesla Model 3 then ? Which would make better sense considering the price range (Porsche must be more expensive than a similarly sized Tesla !).

  • Tumbi Mtika

    The immense difference in quality(and top speed?) will be enough for me to choose this over a Model S P100D. Sign me the fuck up.

    • Tumbi Mtika

      Time for the Germans to show how it’s done.

    • Belthronding Tinuviel

      Tesla drivers are going after 0-60,ludicrous mode acceleration and autonomous driving but this is going to be tough for even Tesla,.
      Porsche driving dynamics and overall quality will be in the market soon. Plus,new Porsche is going to be goddamn looker,can’t wait.

  • Mark S

    So in reality this is the Pajun or the 928E.

  • S3XY

    The more the better. And it better look like the concept. Too sick

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