The Ford GT’s Suspension Is Much Smarter Than A Fifth Grader

The Ford GT may not have a hybrid powertrain or a near million-dollar price tag to match that of its competitors, mainly the Holy Trinity of hypercars, but it’s still one of the most advanced vehicles on sale today.

One of the GT’s more notable pieces of equipment is its suspension setup. It’s one of the things that astonished Jeremy Clarkson, leaving the outspoken journalist to claim the supercar was like a “Mad Caterham.”

Wrapping one’s head around the intricacies of the supercar’s suspension setup requires a Master’s Degree in Engineering. Luckily, Engineering Explained is here to simplify all of the insane engineering that went into the GT’s suspension setup, allowing everyone to marvel at the automaker’s engineers.

To help make things easier for everyone to understand, Jason Fenske of Engineering Explained, created an incredibly helpful animation showcasing the supercar’s double wishbone pushrod suspension setup. Fenske also points out some interesting components on the GT, including the Multimatic eDSSV and a torsion-bar spring system, which consists of a hydraulic actuator, a coil spring, and a rocker.

While the setup itself is unique, things get really interesting when Fenske begins to explain how the GT has bespoke spring rates for the vehicle’s ride height. We won’t get too technical, as the video does a excellent job of explaining the setup, but something astonishing happens when the GT is put into its track mode.

When the car’s sitting just 70-mm off the ground in track mode, the hydraulic actuator locks the coil spring into place, stopping it from moving. This gives the GT a higher spring rate at a lower ride height, ensuring the vehicle won’t bottom out on bumps. Obviously, this is some incredible stuff.

The GT’s suspension setup, as Top Gear’s Chris Harris found is what makes the supercar the “lowest, flattest and yet the most compliant supercar of them all.” With this kind of engineering, it shouldn’t come as a surprise to hear that Ford recently set a new record on the Arctic Circle Raceway.

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  • Bo Hanan

    Does the clever tech mean anything if the end result isn’t segment leading capability?
    Take the Cadillac V8-6-4 for example. Regardless, I have yet to see a comparison
    where the new GT is outhandling everybody else on the track.

    • Well the Cadillac one is pioneer, now everyone using it. You gotta give thumbs up for 80s GM for allowing that.

      • SteersUright

        If you really wanna give GM props, then it deserves full kudos for being the first mainstream manufacturer to bring magnetic shocks to the masses when previously they were limited to the likes of only Ferrari and such. Im not a GM fan in general, but credit where credit is due.

        • eb110americana

          Actually, the Magneride suspension debuted in the Corvette long before Ferrari adopted it. GM wasn’t just the first to bring it to the masses, it was the first, period.

          • SteersUright

            Even more remarkable, thanks for the update. If only GM had staying on the leading edge, they’d be breaking through more new innovative tech instead of the chronic game of trying to catch up with the Germans. Lord knows what goes on inside the very outdated and overly-bureaucratic halls within GM. Id fire every single executive there and put them out to pasture. That company has needed new blood and a fire in its belly for decades.

    • eb110americana

      There are no comparison tests of the GT yet, as far as I have seen. Since there are no videos of Ferrari or Porsche beating the GT, you could just as easily assume they are slower.

  • SteersUright

    I think I appreciate the Ford GT more and more as time passes. However, Bo Hanan makes an excellent point. Cool tech, but does it translate to Ferrari (Etc) beating performance in the real world?

    • Don

      I think you can see the car’s results using a detuned engine (compaired to the street version) watching it in last year’s 24 hours Leman race, this year’s Rolex 24 and the most recent race in the Wec. 6 hours at Spa where the GT finished first in class. A former race driver testing the street version of the Ford GT called it a race car with turn signals. Having the opportunity to see, hear and watch the active suspension close up. Its an amazing Super Car.

      • SteersUright

        Yes but its near $500k. Nobody will argue any Ferrari speciale or stradale models aren’t also race cars for the street, far more exotic brand, and with far more glorious engines than a truck V6. I mean at $500k you can really have some of the worlds best Italians or German cars. A Porsche GT3 RS is another “race car” for the street and stunningly capable with a truly magnificent engine. You can have one for $200k and still have $300k leftover!
        Ford GT is amazing and at $200k it would’ve been a clear contender. At $500k, I’d browse other options.

        • Don

          The GT is hand assembled by Ford and Multimatic, unlike the Porsche 911 GT3 RS you mentioned which is an amazing Super Car that has an amazing engine with a redline of 9000 Rpm’s. It’s handling and racing records are second to none. But calling the GT’s engine a truck engine is like saying the Porsche engine is Volkswagen. You need to read the origin of this Ford V6 power plant and the work they put into it to make it a monster in the Ford GT, then the Raptor. Remember the origin of the Porsche engine is from Volkswagen. Never bothered anyone who was willing to pay more for a Porsche. The V6 in the GT is not a truck engine. It’s a proven powerplant that’s Similar to the EcoBoost engine Ford puts in its F-150 pickup trucks. The key word is similar. It’s proven it’s durability on the race track. The Coyote or other Ford V8’s could not be used in order to get the aero Ford wanted for the GT’s rear and flying buttress. Like the previous Ford GT. This is an investment vehicle due to the car’s amazing design and it’s very limited production. Porsche produces a larger number of
          911 GT3 RS per year world wide. This Car appreciates or at least maintains value depending on mileage. It’s a solid investment car. On the other side, Ford is only Hand assembling 200 GT’s per year making it a true investment vehicle. Most people that spent $450,000 for the GT is looking to make a profit after a couple years. Some do use them as intended on track days, but im guessing that’s a low number. Look at the prior GT. Ford sold around a 4000 copies for an average price of $150,000. They currently sell in the $250,000 + range. If allowed by Ford, the current owners of new GT’s could sell them today in the area of $700,000+. This is a once in a lifetime hand built race & street Supercar and is worth the $450,000 Ford is charging. When the run is finished, I dont think Ford will ever build another GT version unless its a BEV. Porsche will continue to manufacture and improve the 911. That’s why there’s a waiting list with many buyers unable to get on the list. It’s amazing looks, suspension, drivetrain, being hand built, short but strong track record and very limited production makes the GT worth the $450,000 price tag.

          • SteersUright

            I can see your logic and appreciate your perspective. I do love the Ford GT, its absolutely stunning. I just do not love the sound its engine makes whatsoever. And engine sound is like music to me, responsible for 50% of the excitement when driving a special car.
            Were it my $450k and the one and only supercar I could afford at that price, I would personally go with something else. Were it my 10th supercar to add to my fleet? Sure, I’ll take one!

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