Consumer Report’s Review Of BMW’s New 5-Series Comes With Some Surprising Results

BMW have made their modern cars more luxurious, and this means that their sporty abilities have been toned down.

Redesigned from the ground up, the new 5-Series is a good example of sacrificing high-speed cornering in favor of a more comfortable ride, thus making Consumer Reports say that the Jaguar XF is better on twisty roads, after taking the 530i xDrive out for a quick drive.

Their review also points out that the gesture control system made them take their eyes off the road more, to make sure that the features performs the requested task.

The fact that more advanced safety features such as the automatic emergency braking and forward collision are optional and cost a small fortune, didn’t make it win any extra points with CR either, especially since it’s a car that starts from over $52,000 in the United States, with the tested example topping the $65,000 mark. 

Having pointed out that the new 5-Series isn’t flawless, the video also guides us through some of its positive points, which include the almost perfect soundproofing, tech-friendly cabin with wireless smartphone charging, and extra power coming from the 2.0-liter four-cylinder turbo, in this guise.

Nevertheless, it seems that Mike Monticello had some difficulties in getting over the fact that the BMW 5-Series is no longer a nimble athlete.

VIDEO

  • Where’s the Beef

    It’s great that BMW is heading back to being a driver’s automobile, but their styling is handily beat by Mercedes. Mercedes is knocking it out of the ballpark with their current styling movement; BMW newest lineup just looks old and dated.

    • Hello Moto ✓ᵛᵉʳᶦᶠᶦᵉᵈ

      Did you even read the article? It says that the new 5 Series is even less sporty than before.

      • Where’s the Beef

        Yes, I read the article. Did you read my post?. My reference is to the styling—which is poor these days and becoming poorer.

    • sid acidic

      They certainly look good but not higher quality. Mercedes plastic air vents in their greatest S Class is unacceptable

  • cooper

    The 5 series is the perfect sedan.

  • David Peterson

    I wouldn’t pay $60k for a four cylinder McLaren, let alone this attempt. I know the pluses of the argument; they just do not hold water for me. But, then again, only my wife has a daily less than 20 years old. My old V8 two door rear drive wonder suits me and my persona to a tee. And, two hours ago it took a snake embossed car to 80 mph before he started pulling away from me.

  • Bo Hanan

    BMW lost its niche- Sporting sedans with great handling. The competition caught up and left BMW with nowhere to go. It also doesn’t help that BMW watered down “M” by putting it on everything in sight either.

  • Christian Wimmer

    This is one of those cars which bored me to tears in the press photos. It didn’t look like anything special at all, more like a shrunken G30 7-Series.

    However, as soon as I saw it at BMW Welt (I live in Munich, Germany), I was blown away at how elegant and beautiful it actually is. The new 5er actually looks pretty darn sharp when you see it in person. It is of course a very understated design, but it does somehow manage to mesmerize you – at least it did to me.

    As for the sportiness, well, most customers in this class want a comfortable car. Customers keep your brand in business, NOT enthusiasts. BMW is simply offering their customers what they want; and for the driving enthusiasts I am sure there will be special packages available which will enhance the driving experience.

    I do think that some reviewers are completely overreacting to “BMWs lost edge in driving dynamics.” These cars still handle and drive well – and are more comfortable now.

  • Looks like the 1st Generation Genesis Cadenza…

  • OD. LP

    The side profile of this 5-Series reminds me of the recently retired E-Class styling from a 13-14 Mercedes. Sigh… Way to go BMW to drop the torch of bringing spirit and sport to the world through your vehicles.

  • caruso81

    We’ve got two problems. The first is an automotive press that thinks that anyone cares that the BMW corners 5% less effectively than it used to. Sure, the people reading this site and getting ready to roast this comment THINK they care, but unless you’re on the Autobahn looking for the exit to the Nurburgring, it simply doesn’t matter. The only people it matters to are the auto-bloggers who have to go out searching for a “twisty road” that 95% of the world never drives on and if they did aren’t power sliding ten feet from a cliff edge, if only to keep the grocery bags upright.

    Second, and probably more significant is an auto industry that somehow has convinced itself that a family sedan with a prestige badge should somehow START at $52K and that pickup trucks should be selling for $59K.

    • Jom Arara

      It’s not just ‘twisty winding road in the mountains that no one ever goes’. That result also applies to cornering in every street bends in urban area. So it’s legit.

      • Sly

        Bull…most car buyers don’t care about cornering or twisty, winding road as much as we all are led to believe. Just you and the cult.

        Modern luxury car buyers have moved beyond all the handling hype. As Caruso stated, if you are not on the Autobahn, handling dynamic of E12, 28, 34 and E39 BMWs are just not the focus for most luxury car customers. Who would have thought 20 years ago, the Volvo S90 would be the one of the most luxurious, modern, technologically advanced example in the luxury car class. Who would have thought many customers would be cross shopping the S90 against a 5 Series. The game has moved on and so should the cult.

  • Jajiboji

    Driving dynamics and handling should be better or at least on par with e60. What a disappointing result this is! This single result will be a deal breaker for all bmw enthusiasts. Bye bye 5er.

  • Six Thousand Times

    Unfortunately, BMW is going where the market is going: More SUVs, more luxury, rather than more sport.

  • KidRed

    The base model is going to ride soft. The M Sport model is going to drive sporty. Why is that hard for people to understand?

  • Jay Alanby

    It handles much better than the previous model. The F10 5ers are not desirable.

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