Volkswagen ID Could Cost $8,000 Less Than The Tesla Model 3

Volkswagen’s Chief of Corporate Strategy has revealed the production version of the ID concept will costs thousands of dollars less than the Tesla Model 3.

According to Automobil Produktion, Thomas Sedran used the Automobil Forum to announce the Volkswagen ID will undercut the Model 3 by $7,000 to $8,000. Considering the latter car starts at $35,000 that would mean the ID could have a base price as low as $27,000.

The price isn’t official at this point as Sedran is counting on battery prices to drop significantly by the time the car launches. As he explained, lithium-ion batteries currently cost between €150-200 ($172-229) per kilowatt hour but he expect that number to drop to less than a €100 ($114) per kilowatt hour in the future.

Originally unveiled at 2016 Paris Motor Show, the ID concept previews a production model that will be launched in 2020. The concept rode on the MEB platform and had an electric motor that produced 170 PS (125 kW). This enabled the car to accelerate from 0-100 km/h (0-62 mph) in less than eight seconds before hitting a top speed of 160 km/h (99 mph). More importantly, the model could travel between 400-600 km (248-372 miles) on a single charge.

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  • Six_Tymes

    I dislike VW for a few reasons. BUT, i gotta say, I think if they built this car to look exactly like these renders at one point, And the price was indeed 8 grand less than the 3, then a lot more companies besides Tesla would need to be worried. Because this design looks so futuristic, like it belongs, including the blue wheels and trim, it is fantastic design work.

    • Six Thousand Times

      Ya might not get the blue tires.

  • EXCUSES.
    USING THEIR LOGIC IF THEY WAIT UNTIL BATTERY PRICES GO DOWN WHO’S TO SAY TESLA’S PRICES WONT GO DOWN.

    • SteersUright

      Aside from making cars, Tesla is also heavily invested in the latest battery tech, development, and manufacture with the Chinese. I think they’re hedging their position because they know the big players will eventually directly compete and at the very least, they’d have to buy their battery tech from Tesla if they want some of the lightest with highest capacity. I suspect Tesla will be scooped up via a massive buyout from the eventual mainstream manufacturer that wants its infrastructure, tech, and experience with high performance EV’s in order to gain a major advantage over other competitors.

      • Auf Wiedersehen

        This is plausible…or as has been rumored…by Apple. They could make a massive deal with Elon and pay with CASH.

  • Six Thousand Times

    OK, maybe but three years is a long time. I can say that I’d rather buy a VW than pay for the privilege of helping to iron the bugs out of a Tesla as a beta tester.

  • TheBelltower

    But then you’d be driving a Volkswagen. A company that is not dedicated to the production of cars that don’t use fuel. A company that hasn’t (I don’t believe) invested in clean production methods like BMW or an international charging infrastructure like Tesla. A company that has been talking about EVs for decades… but only talking, while they allowed Tesla, Toyota, BMW and Ford prove that EV and hybrid vehicles are a viable option. A company that has been talking about a revival of the VW bus since the 90s. A company that still stinks from their dieselgate scandal.

    Give me a break VW. Screw off with your $8000-cheaper crap.

    • OdysseyTag

      Question is, where are most of your claims coming from? Or is it more of a personal criteria you use to validate your distain for the brand?

      If I didn’t know any better, I’d have sworn you were referring to a company hellbent on creating coal-sourced gas-guzzling road tractors than a company who’s entire 2021> roadmap consists of launching 30 electric models across the board.

      Call me oldschool, but what ever happened to just disliking a car and leaving it at that. But I guess when VW’s “bland and predictible looks” or “but… but dieselgate” draw cards aren’t enough, we turn to calling a more affordable approach to EVs “cheap crap”.

      • TheBelltower

        The reality is, I’ve owned several VW/Audi vehicles and they’ve been amazing. I still have a ten year old S4 that I will probably never sell. But when it comes to producing EVs, VW has a laughable history. VW is known for teasing consumers for years with intriguing concepts, often for decades, then not delivering. It doesn’t matter what their roadmap shows. As we’ve seen with successful EV attempts, like the Tesla and the moderately successful BMW i-cars, then compared with the EV1, the Bolt, and VW’s own lame E-golf. Automakers need more than just an interesting car to be successful. They need an entire ecosystem of sourcing, green manufacturing, charging infrastructure, and other support. And they need to be willing and able to tear themselves away from conventional manufacturing and oil. Tell me where VW has made any efforts in those areas, and I’ll ease-off on my comments.

        • OdysseyTag

          Off the bat, if we had to judge companies on past decisions and motives, I’m sure the world would be a different place. I think on principle alone, VW is heading in the right direction. If you feel that the e-Golf and e-UP! are uninspiring products, that’s your call. To others perhaps they seem more conventional than the more daring designs of BMW’s i-range and perhaps they are more affordable than Tesla’s offerings.

          But to be honest, I’ve yet to see a company who hasn’t prodded exhilarating concepts at Geneva’s and Frankfurt’s promising the future of EV mobility and has gone on to put them in production a year later with Tesla-like success.

          You mention things like entire ecosystems of sourcing, green manufacturing, and charging infrastructures. Do you expect that to happen overnight, moreover from an automotive group who is still counting its loses from the world’s most costly and ill-thoughtout corporate gambles?

          Let’s be clear, Tesla’s rise to prominence is far too unique of a story for any big car maker to simulate. But let’s not villainize those who are stepping up to the challenge of cleaner mobility, much less those who are as vocal and ambitious about it as VW have been of late.

          I agree that right now word needs to become action but a great deal of what VW have said, planned and done I’ve yet to see others even think about.

          • TheBelltower

            I don’t disagree with any of that. Three years is an eternity, and things change rapidly. So those who aren’t leading, are constantly going to be reacting to what the leaders are doing. VW’s gestation period is clearly way too long. They are starting very late and building a roadmap from a playbook that’s already old.

    • Auf Wiedersehen

      I think you are referring to FCA. VW has had a hybrid or plug-in in the line for many years and have been doing alternative fuel vehicles since the 70’s. They are far from inexperienced with EVs. I DO think they need to stop with all the “claims” and get something put out.

      • TheBelltower

        What we’ve seen with plug-in and hybrids vehicles, in order to move the needle, either you’re in it for the long-haul, or you aren’t. It takes a lot to be in it, which requires a major pivot in corporate thinking.

        • Auf Wiedersehen

          Agreed, and I think the diesel scandal has been the nudge they needed. I think they had all their eggs in the diesel basket and that has been a huge success then a huge disaster. I HOPE they focus on EVs now because it’s clearly the future. I have been a very happy VAG owner for on 25 years now and would like to add an EV to my garage for a DD so it saddens me to see nothing in the VW line up I would buy.

          My Cayman will be with me forever now that they have gone flat 4 and my two 8 year old VW will last a long while. Still, I would love an EVW.

  • SteersUright

    It will be cheaper but will it be better? Anyhow, Tesla has to have known the big players would eventually try to take some of their market share. This increase in competition could make all EV’s better cars.

    • Auf Wiedersehen

      Agree

  • Auf Wiedersehen

    That’s great and I love VW, but put up or shut up…